EdgeConneX To Set Footprint in the Malaysia Market To Develop Data Centers
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EdgeConneX To Set Footprint in the Malaysia Market To Develop Data Centers

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EdgeConneX, the global pioneer in Hyperlocal to Hyperscale Data Center Solutions, announces its debut into the Malaysian market with plans to build very close and high-power data centers with a total capacity of about 300 MWs. The new EdgeConneX data centers in Malaysia's Central Business District, Bukit Jalil, and Cyberjaya are strategically positioned and allow customers to build highly customizable configurations to meet any need.

Malaysia, one of Asia's most powerful economies, is set to accelerate its rise with enormous infrastructure and information technology investments, spurred in part by increased digitization and the adoption of modern technologies such as cloud computing and artificial intelligence. This high-tech boom is made possible by the country's broad network connectivity, readily available and affordable power, a variety of port cities, and connections to 22 submarine cables that provide low-latency access to other countries worldwide.

EdgeConneX Managing Director for APAC, Kelvin Fong, notes, "The high demand for scalable, high-capacity infrastructure across the Asia Pacific region fuels EdgeConneX expansion into Malaysia. Our Malaysian data center footprint will contribute to the nation's digital economy, vibrant tech ecosystem, and passion for progress, fostering increased innovation and collaborative partnerships. We look forward to continued and shared success in the region and supporting our customer's capacity expansions into Malaysia."

Structure Research's Head of Research, Jabez Tan, noted, "The Malaysia market is attractive because of its proximity to the Singapore connectivity ecosystem. In addition, the ability to access the densely aggregated set of submarine cables will allow companies across Malaysia to connect to the rest of the APAC region from a single location. Being in such proximity eliminates performance degradation for a large cross-section of the workloads today."

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